6 Boston Landmarks – Then and Now

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Boston is one of the most beautiful and historic cities in the US and has several firsts that you may find surprising. Discover them in six views of Boston landmarks—comparing the 19th century with today.

The Old State House

Built in 1713, the Old State House was the seat of the Massachusetts General Court until 1798. It is a National Historic Landmark as one of the oldest public buildings in the United States. The Boston Massacre occurred in front of the building on March 5, 1770.

The State House from Park Street, Boston by James Kinsella (1857 - 1923)
The State House from Park Street, Boston by James Kinsella (1857 - 1923)

Boston Public Garden

The first public botanical garden in the United States—established in 1837 by philanthropist Horace Gray.

The Boston Public Garden in Spring Arthur Clifton Goodwin (1864 - 1929)
The Boston Public Garden in Spring Arthur Clifton Goodwin (1864 - 1929)



Beacon Hill

Beacon Hill is a historic neighborhood in Boston. With its Federal-style rowhouses and narrow, gaslit streets with brick sidewalks, it is regarded as one of the most desirable and expensive neighborhoods in Boston.

Beacon Street, Boston by Theodore Robinson - 1884
Beacon Street, Boston by Theodore Robinson - 1884

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Boston Common

The 50-acre Boston Common dates from 1634 and is the oldest city park in the United States. It was from here that British troops left for the Battle of Lexington and Concord in the American Revolutionary War.

Boston Common by Frederick Childe Hassam - circa 1890
Boston Common by Frederick Childe Hassam - circa 1890

Charles Street

Charles Street is the name of a north-south street in the city center of Boston. Among notable residents was Edgar Allan Poe—author, poet, and literary critic, considered part of the American Romantic Movement.

Charles Street, Boston by Maurice Prendergast - circa 1895
Charles Street, Boston by Maurice Prendergast - circa 1895

Revere Beach

Founded in 1895, Revere Beach was the first public beach in the United States. It was "the first to be set aside and governed by a public body for the enjoyment of the common people." An estimated 45,000 people showed up on opening day.

Revere Beach, Boston by Maurice Prendergast - circa 1897
Revere Beach, Boston by Maurice Prendergast - circa 1897



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